Reserve Unit

"America has a long tradition of citizens volunteering to serve their community. The Clark County Sheriff Reserves continue that tradition of volunteer service by volunteering thousands of hours of law enforcement services annually to our citizens. I could not be more proud of these dedicated men and women."
-Sheriff Chuck Atkins
 

Clark County Sheriff's Office Reserve Unit Annual Report (2018)

* * * The Clark County Sheriff's Office is currently only recruiting lateral transfers for Reserve Deputy positions. Applicants must have already been trained and credentialed as full-time or Reserve law enforcement officers in Washington or from another state. * * *

Reserve bike patrol

What are the duties of a Reserve Deputy?

Reserve Deputies are commissioned and sworn with full law enforcement powers equal to those of a full time deputy or police officer. The primary duties include:  Routine patrol, answering "911" calls for service, crime scene protection, community service and events, and disaster response. Additional opportunities depending upon interest include traffic enforcement, marine patrol, search and rescue, etc.

What are the qualifications to be a Reserve Deputy?

Some of the qualifications are:  United States citizen (or lawful permanent resident), at least 21 years old (at time of academy completion in late June), valid driver license, no felony convictions, no Domestic Violence convictions, no recent drug use, and a high school diploma (or equivalent). Reserve Deputies must live within 60 minutes response time to Clark County.

What are the age and physical requirements?

Must be at least 21 years old (at time of academy completion in late June; you may begin testing at age 20).  You must also be able to pass a physical agility test. Current Reserve Deputies are men and women, ranging in age from their 20's to 60's.

Why do people join the Sheriff's Reserves?

For two primary reasons. First, because they are interested in a law enforcement career, and this serves as an opportunity to explore the career. Second, because they are otherwise employed and wish to volunteer with the community in an exciting and meaningful way.

What are the time commitments of a Reserve Deputy?

During the first year of probation, the hourly minimums are 24 hours per month. Afterwards, Reserve Deputies must volunteer a minimum of 12 hours per month. Eight hours are spent on routine patrol, answering calls, for service, etc. The remaining four hours are dedicated to monthly training and community service.

Reserve deputies training at firearms range

What equipment must I buy?

Nothing. The Sheriff's Office issues all needed equipment. This includes uniforms, boots, jacket, badge, duty belt, handcuffs, radio, CEW (conducted electrical weapon), OC spray, baton, and a handgun. Some Reserves elect to carry their own handgun.

How do I become a Reserve Deputy?

The first step is to take a written test. These are typically offered about three times per year. Having passed that test, candidates must then take the following tests:  physical agility, psychological, medical exam, electronic truth verification, oral board interview, and a background investigation. Having successfully completed all of those, the candidate becomes a recruit and is sent through a local, state certified Reserve Academy.

How do I begin?

The Clark County Sheriff's Office is currently only recruiting lateral transfers for Reserve Deputy positions. Applicants must have already been trained and credentialed as full-time or Reserve law enforcement officers in Washington or from another state.