COVID-19 vaccine

Everyone 12 years and older is eligible to get the COVID-19 vaccine. Only the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine is authorized for use in people 12 years and older. Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccine are available for those 18 years and older.

COVID-19 vaccine is available at many local pharmacies and medical offices. If you have a health care provider, check to see if they’re providing COVID-19 vaccinations.

To find a location near you offering COVID-19 vaccine:

Third doses and booster doses

Booster doses

On Sept. 24, 2021, the CDC issued recommendations for Pfizer booster doses for certain groups at increased risk.

The CDC recommends a booster dose of the Pfizer vaccine at least 6 months after the second dose for these groups:

  • People 65 and older
  • Residents in long-term care facilities
  • People 50-64 years old with underlying medical conditions
  • People 18-49 years old with underlying medical conditions may also receive a booster, based on their individual benefits and risks.
  • People 18-64 years old who are at increased risk for COVID-19 exposure and transmission because of their occupation may receive a booster, based on their individual benefits and risks.
    • According to the CDC, occupations at increased risk for COVID-19 exposure and transmission include front line essential workers and health care workers, including:
      • First responders (healthcare workers, firefighters, police, congregate care staff)
      • Education staff (teachers, support staff, daycare workers)
      • Food and agriculture workers
      • Manufacturing workers
      • Corrections workers
      • U.S. Postal Service workers
      • Public transit workers
      • Grocery store workers

For information on qualifying underlying medical conditions, visit the CDC website. People who are unsure whether they should receive a booster dose should consult with their primary care provider. 

These recommendations only apply to those who received the two-dose Pfizer series. Booster doses are not currently recommended for any other groups, and there are not currently any recommendations for booster doses of Moderna or Johnson & Johnson vaccine. The CDC will evaluate data in the coming weeks to make additional recommendations for other groups or people who received the Moderna or Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

For more information about Pfizer booster doses, visit the CDC website.

Third doses for people who are immunocompromised

People who are moderately to severely immunocompromised can get a third dose of mRNA COVID-19 vaccine (Pfizer or Moderna).

The COVID-19 vaccines continue to be very effective, but emerging data suggest people with moderately to severely compromised immune systems do not always build the same level of immunity as people who are not immunocompromised.

As a result, the CDC is recommending a third dose of mRNA vaccines to people who have:

  • Been receiving active cancer treatment for tumors or cancers of the blood
  • Received an organ transplant and are taking medicine to suppress the immune system
  • Received a stem cell transplant within the last 2 years or are taking medicine to suppress the immune system
  • Moderate or severe primary immunodeficiency (such as DiGeorge syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome)
  • Advanced or untreated HIV infection
  • Active treatment with high-dose corticosteroids or other drugs that may suppress your immune response

People should talk to their healthcare provider about their medical condition, and whether getting an additional dose is appropriate for them.

A person receiving a third dose should get it at least 28 days after the second dose. When possible, the person should receive the same vaccine as the first two doses but may receive the other mRNA vaccine brand if the original vaccine is not available.

At this time, no additional dose is recommended for people who had the Johnson & Johnson (Janssen) vaccine. People who received J&J should not get a second dose of either J&J or a dose of an mRNA vaccine. There is not enough data at this time to determine whether immunocompromised people who received the J&J vaccine also have an improved antibody response following an additional dose of the same vaccine.

Need a ride?

Washington state has partnered with Uber and Lyft to provide free and discounted rides to vaccine appointments for people who need transportation assistance. Call the state COVID-19 information hotline, 833.VAX.HELP, to request a ride to your appointment.

Community in Motion (formerly Human Services Council) can also provide rides to COVD-19 vaccination sites. Rides are available to Clark, Cowlitz and Wahkiakum county residents through December 2021. Call 360.762.5292 to request a ride.

Vaccination cards

When you receive your COVID-19 vaccine, you will be given a vaccination card. The card is an official record of your vaccination.

Keep your vaccination card in a safe place because you may need it for travel or possibly booster doses later. Consider taking a photo of your card (front and back) to have a digital copy handy or make a photocopy to carry in your purse or wallet.

Can’t find your vaccination card?

You can get your official vaccination record online through the state’s MyIR (My Immunization Records) website.

Visit MyIR Mobile to sign up for free. If you already have a MyIR account, you’re ready to access your immunization records. The state Department of Health website has additional information about MyIR and other ways you can access your immunization records.

If you need help accessing your records through MyIR, call the state’s COVID-19 hotline: 833.829.4357 (833.VAX.HELP).

COVID-19 vaccine administered

Doses administered, as of Monday, Sept. 20:

  • 525,963 doses administered in Clark County
  • 287,599 Clark County residents with at least one dose (67.7% residents 12+ years old)
  • 259,224 Clark County residents fully vaccinated (61.0% residents 12+ years old)

Doses administered and number of residents vaccinated may not align because people may be vaccinated in a county other than where they live.

Washington State Department of Health provides the data on COVID-19 vaccine doses administered. Visit the state’s COVID-19 Data Dashboard for the additional vaccine data.

Vaccination by age

 

Updated Sept. 8. Data is from Washington Department of Health's COVID-19 data dashboard. Percentages are based on the total population in Clark County for each age group. 

Vaccination by gender

 

Updated Sept. 8. Data is from Washington Department of Health's COVID-19 data dashboard.

Vaccination by race/ethnicity

 

Updated Sept. 8. Data is from Washington Department of Health's COVID-19 data dashboard. Percentages reflect the percent of vaccinated people who identify with each race/ethnicity. For example, 68% of Clark County residents who have been vaccinated identify as white and 8% of Clark County residents who have been vaccinated identify as Hispanic/Latino. 

COVID-19 vaccination by zip code

COVID-19 vaccination initiated 

 

Updated Sept. 3. Initiated vaccination means they have completed one dose of any COVID-19 vaccine and includes those who are fully vaccinated. Percentages are based on the total number of residents (all ages) in each zip code.

COVID-19 vaccination completed 

 

Updated Sept. 3. Completed vaccination means they have completed two doses of a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine or one dose of a single-dose COVID-19 vaccine. Percentages are based on the total number of residents (all ages) in each zip code.